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SpecialFeature Ecology, 85(6), 2004, pp. 15031511
 

Summary: 1503
SpecialFeature
Ecology, 85(6), 2004, pp. 15031511
2004 by the Ecological Society of America
THE DUAL ROLE OF FLORAL TRAITS: POLLINATOR ATTRACTION
AND PLANT DEFENSE
REBECCA E. IRWIN,1,2,5
LYNN S. ADLER,3
AND ALISON K. BRODY2,4
1Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 USA
2Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, Crested Butte, Colorado 81224 USA
3Department of Biology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 USA
4Department of Biology, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 USA
Abstract. Plants are under siege from a diversity of enemies that consume both leaf
and floral parts. Plants resist damage to leaves in a variety of ways, and we now have a
rich literature documenting how plants defend themselves against herbivore attack. In con-
trast, the mechanisms by which plants resist enemies that consume floral parts or resources
are much less known, even though damage to floral tissue usually has tighter links to plant
fitness than damage to leaf tissue. Many plants experience nectar robbing, whereby floral
visitors remove nectar from flowers, often without pollinating. Nectar robbers can reduce

  

Source: Adler, Lynn - Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology