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Recombination and loss of complementation: a more than two-fold cost for parthenogenesis
 

Summary: Recombination and loss of complementation: a more than two-fold
cost for parthenogenesis
M. ARCHETTI
De´partement de Biologie, Section Ecologie et Evolution, Universite´ de Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland
Introduction
In a sexual species with an equal ratio of males and
females, a mutation on a gene that causes a female to
produce only parthenogenetic female offspring is certain
to be transmitted to all the eggs produced by that female,
whereas a gene that permits meiosis is transmitted only
to half the eggs. Put another way, asexual females can
produce twice as many daughters as sexual females, so
that the ratio of asexual to sexual females should, at least
initially, double at each generation. This argument
(Maynard-Smith, 1971, 1978) is known as the `two-fold
cost of meiosis', although the cost is not always actually
two-fold and not necessarily associated with meiosis
(Lewis, 1987). In fact, in species with isogamous gametes
there is no such cost, and the argument therefore does
not hold for the origin of sexual reproduction, when

  

Source: Archetti, Marco - Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine