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Tsetse immune responses and trypanosome transmission: Implications for the development
 

Summary: Tsetse immune responses and trypanosome
transmission: Implications for the development
of tsetse-based strategies to reduce
trypanosomiasis
Zhengrong Hao*, Irene Kasumba*, Michael J. Lehane
, Wendy C. Gibson
, Johnny Kwon*, and Serap Aksoy*
*Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Section of Vector Biology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510; School of Biological
Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor LL57 2UW, United Kingdom; and School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 IUG, United Kingdom
Edited by John H. Law, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, and approved August 14, 2001 (received for review July 16, 2001)
Tsetse flies are the medically and agriculturally important vectors
of African trypanosomes. Information on the molecular and bio-
chemical nature of the tsetse trypanosome interaction is lacking.
Here we describe three antimicrobial peptide genes, attacin, de-
fensin, and diptericin, from tsetse fat body tissue obtained by
subtractive cloning after immune stimulation with Escherichia coli
and trypanosomes. Differential regulation of these genes shows
the tsetse immune system can discriminate not only between
molecular signals specific for bacteria and trypanosome infections
but also between different life stages of trypanosomes. The

  

Source: Aksoy, Serap - School of Public Health, Yale University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine