Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Finding Bugs is Easy, by Prof. William Pugh, Computer Science Software quality is important, but often imperfect in practice. A study by NIST
 

Summary: 
Finding Bugs is Easy, by Prof. William Pugh, Computer Science
Software quality is important, but often imperfect in practice. A study by NIST
concluded that software bugs cost the U.S. economy $60 billion annually. Many
different techniques are used to try to improve software quality, including testing,
code review, and formal specification. One of the techniques that has become
popular in the past decade is static analysis: software that automatically analyzes
the software in question, looking for mistakes, much as a grammar checker looks for
mistakes in English text. These tools evaluate software in the abstract, without
executing them or considering a specific input. Rather than trying to prove that the
code fulfills its specification, static analysis tools look for violations of reasonable or
recommended programming practices. Just as poor grammar checkers can be
annoying, a poor static analyzer can produce many annoying warnings and catch
few real errors. A number of research efforts have developed software static
analysis tools, but most did not scale up to being able to analyze production
software. Several commercial tools became successful in specific markets, but they
are exceptionally expressive and only used by a limited number of companies.
By carefully examining the bugs that occur in practice, the FindBugs project at the
University of Maryland found many of them could be accurately detected with
relatively simple techniques. One of the surprising findings was that even

  

Source: Anisimov, Mikhail - Institute for Physical Science and Technology & Department of Chemical Engineering and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland at College Park

 

Collections: Physics; Materials Science