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Ecology, 89(8), 2008, pp. 22072217 2008 by the Ecological Society of America
 

Summary: Ecology, 89(8), 2008, pp. 22072217
2008 by the Ecological Society of America
NECTAR SECONDARY COMPOUNDS AFFECT SELF-POLLEN TRANSFER:
IMPLICATIONS FOR FEMALE AND MALE REPRODUCTION
REBECCA E. IRWIN
1,3
AND LYNN S. ADLER
2
1
Department of Biology, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 USA
2
Department of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences and Graduate Program in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology,
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 USA
Abstract. Pollen movement within and among plants affects inbreeding, plant fitness, and
the spatial scale of genetic differentiation. Although a number of studies have assessed how
plant and floral traits influence pollen movement via changes in pollinator behavior, few have
explored how nectar chemical composition affects pollen transfer. As many as 55% of plants
produce secondary compounds in their nectar, which is surprising given that nectar is typically
thought to attract pollinators. We tested the hypothesis that nectar with secondary
compounds may benefit plants by encouraging pollinators to leave plants after visiting only

  

Source: Adler, Lynn - Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology