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Akakaya H.R. and P. Sjgren-Gulve. 2000. Population viability analysis in conservation planning: an overview. Ecological Bulletins 48:9-21.
 

Summary: Akšakaya H.R. and P. Sj÷gren-Gulve. 2000. Population viability analysis in
conservation planning: an overview. Ecological Bulletins 48:9-21.
1
This is a preprint of Akšakaya H.R. and P. Sj÷gren-Gulve. 2000. Population viability analy-
sis in conservation planning: an overview. Ecological Bulletins 48:9-21.
Population viability analyses in conservation planning: an overview
H. Reit Akšakaya and Per Sj÷gren-Gulve
Population viability analysis (PVA) is a collection of methods for evaluating
the threats faced by populations of species, their risks of extinction or decline,
and their chances for recovery, based on species-specific data and models.
Compared to other alternatives for making conservation decisions, PVA pro-
vides a rigorous methodology that can use different types of data, a way to in-
corporate uncertainties and natural variabilities, and products or predictions
that are relevant to conservation goals. The disadvantages of PVA include its
single-species focus and requirements for data that may not be available for
many species. PVAs are most useful when they address a specific question in-
volving a focal (e.g., threatened, indicator, sensitive, or umbrella) species,
when their level of detail is consistent with the available data, and when they
focus on relative (i.e., comparative) rather than absolute results, and risks of
decline rather than extinction. This overview provides guidelines for choosing

  

Source: Akšakaya, H. Resit - Department of Ecology and Evolution, SUNY at Stony Brook

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology