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THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 527:10091022, 1999 December 20 1999. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.(
 

Summary: THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 527:1009»1022, 1999 December 20
1999. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A.(
THE NEAR-INFRARED SKY EMISSION AT THE SOUTH POLE IN WINTER
A. PHILLIPS, M. G. BURTON, M. C. B. ASHLEY, J. W. V. STOREY, AND J. P. LLOYD1,2
School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia 2052
D. A. HARPER
University of Chicago, Yerkes Observatory, Williams Bay, Wisconsin 53191
AND
J. BALLY
Department of Atmospheric, Planetary, and Astrophysical Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0391
Received 1998 November 23; accepted 1999 August 5
ABSTRACT
The Antarctic plateau provides superb sites for infrared astronomy, a result of the combination of low
temperatures, low levels of precipitable water vapor, high altitude, and atmospheric stability. We have
undertaken measurements of the sky background from 1 to 5 km at the South Pole, using a single
channel InSb spectrometer, the Infrared Photometer Spectrometer (IRPS), during the winter (dark)
period of 1995. The IRPS records the DC level of the sky —ux through a 4° beam and a variety of
broadband and narrowband (1%) –lters. It can be scanned in elevation from horizon to horizon through
the zenith. We –nd a 20»100 times reduction in the background of thermal emission compared to that
from mid-latitude sites such as Siding Spring and Mauna Kea, with typical background levels of 80»200

  

Source: Ashley, Michael C. B. - School of Physics, University of New South Wales

 

Collections: Physics