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MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser
 

Summary: MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES
Mar Ecol Prog Ser
Vol. 209: 203217, 2001 Published January 5
INTRODUCTION
Despite the harsh and variable environment they in-
habit, Antarctic krill Euphausia superba are extremely
abundant across a wide geographic range (Marr 1962,
Mackintosh 1973, Mauchline 1980, Miller & Hampton
1989). Antarctic krill experience annual fluctuations in
water temperature and food supply (e.g. Quetin & Ross
1991, Capella et al. 1992). Furthermore, they are the
dominant prey item for a suite of predators with vary-
ing feeding behavior (e.g. Miller & Hampton 1989, Hill
et al. 1996, Reid et al. 1996, Croll & Tershy 1998, Croll
et al. 1998). Survival and growth in krill pose a com-
plex ecological and evolutionary problem. How and
why are krill so successful? A variety of strategies have
been hypothesized to allow krill to survive harsh
Antarctic winters such as shrinkage, lowered meta-*E-mail: shalonzo@cats.ucsc.edu
Survival strategies and growth of krill: avoiding

  

Source: Alonzo, Suzanne H. - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology; Biology and Medicine