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Plus One Recall Store In this chapter, we will do our first computer experiments with genetic programming. Genetic
 

Summary: Chapter 8
Plus One Recall Store
In this chapter, we will do our first computer experiments with genetic programming. Genetic
programming in its modern form was invented by John Koza and John Rice [38, 39, 40].
An excellent book on the subject is the book "Genetic Programming: An Introduction" by
Wolfgang Banzhaf and Peter Nordin and Robert E. Keller. Genetic programming is the use
of evolutionary computation to produce small pieces of computer code. The first attempts
at this were done by R. M. Friedberg and his collaborators at IBM in the late 1950's [27, 28].
A fascinating method of evolving self reproducing computer programs appears in Tom Ray's
"An approach to the synthesis of life" [48] which is repreinted in [23].
The first section of the chapter is intended as a general introduction to genetic pro-
gramming and is less narrowly focused than the rest of the chapter. It also contains no
experiments, just preparatory reading and problems intended to build needed mental mus-
cles. The second section introduces the Plus-One-Recall-Store (PORS) problems, previewed
in Problems 1.16 and 1.17. The technical background of this genetic programming problem
appears in [6]. The third section studies in detail the technique of population seeding, us-
ing non-random initial populations to enhance performance of an evolutionary algorithm.
The fourth section applies various generic techniques for improving evolutionary computa-
tion from earlier chapters to the PORS problems. The structure of the experiments in this
chapter are given in Figure 8.1.

  

Source: Ashlock, Dan - Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Guelph

 

Collections: Mathematics