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Genetic Epidemiology 31: 338347 (2007) Heritability Estimation of Sex-Specific Effects on Human
 

Summary: Genetic Epidemiology 31: 338347 (2007)
Heritability Estimation of Sex-Specific Effects on Human
Quantitative Traits
Lin Pan,1
Carole Ober,1,2
and Mark Abney1
1
Department of Human Genetics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
Recent studies have suggested that sex-specific genetic architecture could be because of the effects of autosomal genes that
are differentially expressed in males and females. Yet, few studies have explored the effects of X-linked genes on sex-
specific genetic architecture. In this study, we extended the variance component, maximum likelihood method to evaluate
the relative contributions of sex-specific effects on both autosomes and the X chromosome to estimates of heritability of 20
quantitative human phenotypes in the Hutterites. Seventeen of these traits were previously analyzed in this population
under a model that did not include X chromosomal effects; three traits are analyzed for the first time (age at menarche,
percent fat and fat-free mass [FFM]). Seven traits (systolic blood pressure (SBP), adult height, fasting insulin, triglycerides,
lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], serotonin, and age at menarche) showed significant X-linked effects; three of these (SBP, adult height,
and triglycerides) showed X-linked effects only in males. Four traits (Lp(a), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, ratio of
percent predicted forced expiratory volume at 1 s/forced vital capacity, and FFM) showed significant sex-environment

  

Source: Abney, Mark - Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago
Das, Soma - Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Computer Technologies and Information Sciences