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31 OCTOBER 2003 VOL 302 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org774 CREDIT:C.SCHARDL/UNIVERSITYOFKENTUCKY
 

Summary: 31 OCTOBER 2003 VOL 302 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org774
CREDIT:C.SCHARDL/UNIVERSITYOFKENTUCKY
Even as the bride and groom walk down
the aisle, they--or at least their guests--
know that marital bliss can be short-lived.
Wrinkles can appear in the smoothest rela-
tionships and turn lovers into adversaries.
Biologists are now realizing that the same
holds true in symbiotic relationships. What
starts out as a mutually beneficial arrange-
ment can turn into a commensal one, in
which just one partner benefits. In the
worst case, one symbiont begins to para-
sitize the other. But sometimes the partners
work through adversity to restore balance
in their alliance.
A new awareness of the complex-
ity of these interactions is shaking up
the ecology and evolutionary biology
communities, which are used to

  

Source: Ayres, Matthew.P. - Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College
Sachs, Joel - Department of Integrative Biology, University of California at Berkeley
West, Stuart - School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology