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Ecological Applications, 17(4), 2007, pp. 11161126 2007 by the Ecological Society of America
 

Summary: Ecological Applications, 17(4), 2007, pp. 11161126
2007 by the Ecological Society of America
ADAPTIVE REVERSALS IN ACID TOLERANCE IN COPEPODS
FROM LAKES RECOVERING FROM HISTORICAL STRESS
ALISON M. DERRY AND SHELLEY E. ARNOTT
Department of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 Canada
Abstract. Anthropogenic habitat disturbance can often lead to rapid evolution of
environmental tolerances in taxa that are able to withstand the stressor. What we do not
understand, however, is how species respond when the stressor no longer exists, especially
across landscapes and over a considerable length of time. Once anthropogenic disturbance is
removed and if there is an ecological trade-off associated with local adaptation to such an
historical stressor, then evolutionary theory would predict evolutionary reversals. On the
Boreal Shield, tens of thousands of lakes acidified as a result of SO2 emissions, but many of
these lakes are undergoing chemical recovery as a consequence of reduced emissions. We
investigated the adaptive consequences of disturbance and recovery to zooplankton living in
these lakes by asking (1) if contemporary evolution of acid tolerance had arisen among
Leptodiaptomus minutus copepod populations in multiple circum-neutral lakes with and
without historical acidification, (2) if L. minutus populations were adaptively responding to
reversals in selection in historically acidified lakes that had recovered to pH 6.0 for at least 68
years, and (3) if there was a fitness trade-off for L. minutus individuals with high acid tolerance

  

Source: Arnott, Shelley - Department of Biology, Queen's University (Kingston)

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology; Biology and Medicine