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Minimizing Bandwidth Requirements for On-Demand Data Delivery* Derek Eager Mary Vernon John Zahorjan
 

Summary: Minimizing Bandwidth Requirements for On-Demand Data Delivery*
Derek Eager Mary Vernon John Zahorjan
Dept. of Computer Science Computer Sciences Dept. Dept. of Computer Science
Univ. of Saskatchewan Univ. of Wisconsin Univ. of Washington
eager@cs.usask.ca vernon@cs.wisc.edu zahorjan@cs.washington.edu
Abstract
Recent techniques for multicast or broadcast delivery of streaming media can provide immediate service to each client
request yet achieve considerable client stream sharing (i.e., server and network bandwidth savings). This paper considers
(1) the maximum savings in the required server (disk I/O and network) bandwidth that any such technique can provide, (2)
the interplay between achievable reductions in required server bandwidth and available client receive bandwidth, (3) how
well the previously proposed techniques perform relative to each other and to the minimum required server bandwidth for
the assumed client capabilities, and (4) whether there are new practical delivery techniques that can achieve better server
bandwidth savings than the previous techniques, yet still provide immediate service to client requests.
The principal results are as follows. First, we derive the minimum required server bandwidth for any delivery technique that
provides immediate service to client requests, and find that this bandwidth grows logarithmically with the client request
arrival rate. Second, we show that the minimum required server bandwidth can be nearly achieved if clients have receive
bandwidth equal to three times the streaming rate and have sufficient storage for buffering data from shared streams. Third,
we show that a particular implementation of the recently proposed partitioned dynamic skyscraper delivery technique
provides immediate service to client requests more simply and directly than the original dynamic skyscraper method.
Fourth, the recently proposed optimized stream tapping/grace patching/controlled multicast technique achieves nearly the

  

Source: Anderson, Richard - Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Washington at Seattle

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences