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N E W S A N D V I E W S 286 VOLUME 39 | NUMBER 3 | MARCH 2007 | NATURE GENETICS
 

Summary: N E W S A N D V I E W S
286 VOLUME 39 | NUMBER 3 | MARCH 2007 | NATURE GENETICS
Shaping specificity in signaling networks
Réka Albert & Zoltán N Oltvai
Signaling pathways are frequently connected through shared intracellular molecules, yet they manage to maintain
remarkable specificity to distinct stimuli. A new study identifies mechanisms to explain how this specificity is
shaped for MAP kinase modules within the yeast signaling network.
A characteristic feature of cellular signaling
in eukaryotic cells is that components are fre-
quently shared among pathways, providing a
potential for cross-talk. However, this can also
lead to an inappropriate response, if stimulus-
specific signals transmitted through one path-
way inadvertently cross-activate the other(s).A
report on page 409 of this issue by McClean et
al.1 describesamechanism,referredtoasmutual
inhibition,thateliminatesunwantedinteraction
between two yeast mitogen-activated protein
(MAP) kinase pathways, even when shared
molecular signals for both pathways are simul-

  

Source: Albert, Réka - Departments of Biology & Physics, Pennsylvania State University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine