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The evolution of repeated mating under sexual conflict R. HA RDLING* & A. KAITALA
 

Summary: The evolution of repeated mating under sexual conflict
R. HAĻ RDLING* & A. KAITALA
*Department of Animal Ecology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Department of Biology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
Introduction
In many insect mating systems, it has been possible to
demonstrate sexual conflict over the occurrence of
mating. These sexual conflicts arise because of female
costs of mating, caused by male traits that increase male
competitive success at the expense of female fitness. Such
male traits in turn leads to the evolution of counteracting
female traits, and at an evolutionary equilibrium, male
and female antagonistic traits should be balanced,
although population fitness may simultaneously be
reduced because of the costs of antagonism (Parker,
1979; Rice & Holland, 1997; Gavrilets et al., 2000;
Arnqvist & Rowe, 2002a,b). Several female fitness costs
of excess mating are known to exist (Stockley, 1997). The
costs include time and energy devoted to matings (Daly,
1978), increased risk of predation while mating (Wing,

  

Source: Agrell, Jep - Department of Ecology, Lunds Universitet

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology