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Heeding the voice of experience: The role of talker variation in lexical access q
 

Summary: Heeding the voice of experience:
The role of talker variation in lexical access q
Sarah C. Creel a,*, Richard N. Aslin b
, Michael K. Tanenhaus b
a
Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania,
3401 Walnut St. Room 302C, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
b
University of Rochester, Rochester, USA
Received 15 June 2006; revised 20 March 2007; accepted 25 March 2007
Abstract
Two experiments used the head-mounted eye-tracking methodology to examine the time
course of lexical activation in the face of a non-phonemic cue, talker variation. We found that
lexical competition was attenuated by consistent talker differences between words that would
otherwise be lexical competitors. In Experiment 1, some English cohort word-pairs were con-
sistently spoken by a single talker (male couch, male cows), while other word-pairs were spoken
by different talkers (male sheep, female sheet). After repeated instances of talker-word pairings,
words from different-talker pairs showed smaller proportions of competitor fixations than
words from same-talker pairs. In Experiment 2, participants learned to identify black-and-
white shapes from novel labels spoken by one of two talkers. All of the 16 novel labels were

  

Source: Aslin, Richard N. - Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester
DeAngelis, Gregory - Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine