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Memory & Cognition 1993, 21(2), 267-279
 

Summary: Memory & Cognition
1993, 21(2), 267-279
Infants' eyewitness testimony:
Effects of postevent information
on a prior memory representation
CAROLYN ROVEE-COLLIER, MARGARET A. BORZA, SCOTI' A. ADLER,
and KIMBERLY BOLLER
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey
In eyewitness testimony research,postevent information impair retention oLthe~origina1event
and increases the probability that interpolated information will be identifled~aspart:oftheorigi-
nal event. The present experiments studied these effects with 3-month-olds. Infants learned to
kick tomove a particular crib mobile and then were briefly exposedto information about a novel
mobile. The novel postevent information impaired recognition ofthe-original mobile whenit im-
mediately followed training but not when it was delayed by 1 day. Like adults, infants treated
the postevent information as part ofthe original training event, continuing to do so for at least
2 weeks. We proposethat postevent information displaces conflicting information coactive with
it in primary memory and creates a new, updatedmemory token ofthe event. Once the new token
leaves primary memory, however, it is protected; only a copy can be retrieved and modified in
the future.
It is well established that information that is encoun-

  

Source: Adler, Scott A. - Centre for Vision Research & Department of Psychology, York University (Toronto)

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine