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The Legend of Stonehenge History of the Kings of Britain is a famous story written by a well-known twelfth century writer called Geoffrey of
 

Summary: The Legend of Stonehenge
History of the Kings of Britain is a famous story written by a well-known twelfth century writer called Geoffrey of
Monmouth in 1136. In the story, Geoffrey tried to explain the truth behind Stonehenge. The legend of Stonehenge is
associated to a famous magician by the name of Merlin and King Arthur, who was the nephew of King Aurelius
Ambrosius. Geoffrey believed that Stonehenge was a memorial to Aurelius Ambrosius's battle victory at Amesbury and
was brought from Ireland to Salisbury Plain by Merlin's magic.
The story began in the fifth century whereby about 300 noblemen were killed by Hengest, who was a treacherous
Saxon leader at that time. Fortunately, King Aurelius Ambrosius wanted to seek justice and finally won the battle and
managed to kill Hengest.
King Aurelius wanted to create a memorial for the noblemen killed and magician Merlin suggested transporting
the Giant's stone rings from Ireland to Britain. According to Geoffrey, the stones rings were brought primarily from Africa
to Ireland by Giants, hence explaining the name given to the stone rings.
In the later part of the century, King Uther and Merlin led a group of people to Mount Killaraus in Ireland to where
the stones were situated. The stones proved to be too gigantic for them to move as neither do they posses any
supernatural powers nor are they giants.
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Therefore, it was up to Merlin to do the task. Merlin used his magic powers to dissemble the stones and shipped
them back to Britain. The great stones were then set up and aligned in a circle around the graves of the murdered
noble men.
In other periods of the century, various Kings at their time were buried at Stonehenge. Some of the Kings buried

  

Source: Aslaksen, Helmer - Department of Mathematics, National University of Singapore

 

Collections: Mathematics