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Canopy-tree influences along a soil parent material gradient in Pinus ponderosa-Quercus gambelii forests, northern Arizona
 

Summary: Canopy-tree influences along a soil parent material gradient in
Pinus ponderosa-Quercus gambelii forests, northern Arizona
Scott R. Abella1,2
Public Lands Institute and School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas,
NV 89154-2040
Judith D. Springer
Ecological Restoration Institute, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ 86011-5017
ABELLA, S. R. (Public Lands Institute and School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las
Vegas, NV 89154-2040) AND J. D. SPRINGER (Ecological Restoration Institute, Northern Arizona University,
Flagstaff, AZ 86011-5017). Canopy-tree influences along a soil parent material gradient in Pinus ponderosa-
Quercus gambelii forests, northern Arizona. J. Torrey Bot. Soc. 135: 2636. 2008.--The distribution of
canopy trees can impose within-site patterns of soil properties and understory plant composition. At ten sites
spanning a soil parent material gradient in northern Arizona Pinus ponderosa-Quercus gambelii forests, we
compared soils and plant composition among five canopy types: openings, Pinus ponderosa single trees,
Quercus gambelii single stems, dispersed clumps, and thickets. Soil texture on average did not differ
significantly among canopy types, whereas Oi horizon thickness and weight, 015 cm soil loss-on-ignition,
and gravimetric soil moisture differed significantly among three or more canopy types. Understory plant
richness per 4 m2
ranged from five species below P. ponderosa to 12 species in openings, with richness below
Q. gambelii single stems significantly greater than below Q. gambelii thickets. C4 graminoids (e.g., Aristida

  

Source: Abella, Scott R. - School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada at Las Vegas

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology