Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
402 nature genetics volume 32 november 2002 Genome sequence of the endocellular obligate symbiont
 

Summary: letter
402 nature genetics volume 32 november 2002
Genome sequence of the endocellular obligate symbiont
of tsetse flies, Wigglesworthia glossinidia
Leyla Akman1,5*, Atsushi Yamashita2*, Hidemi Watanabe3, Kenshiro Oshima4, Tadayoshi Shiba2, Masahira
Hattori2,3 & Serap Aksoy1
*These authors contributed equally to this work.
1Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Section of Vector Biology, Yale University School of Medicine, 60 College Street, 606 LEPH, New Haven,
Connecticut 06510, USA. 2School of Science, Kitasato University, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 228-8555, Japan. 3Human Genome Research Group,
RIKEN Genomic Sciences Center, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan. 4Hitachi Instruments Service Company, Ltd., Tokyo,
Japan. 5Present address: Center for Infectious Diseases, Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, State University of New York, Stony Brook, Stony
Brook, New York 11794, USA. Correspondence should be addressed to S.A. (e-mail: serap.aksoy@yale.edu) or M.H. (e-mail: hattori@genome.ls.kitasato_u.ac.jp).
Many insects that rely on a single food source throughout their
developmental cycle harbor beneficial microbes that provide
nutrients absent from their restricted diet. Tsetse flies, the vec-
tors of African trypanosomes, feed exclusively on blood and
rely on one such intracellular microbe for nutritional provision-
ing and fecundity. As a result of co-evolution with hosts over
millions of years, these mutualists have lost the ability to sur-
vive outside the sheltered environment of their host insect

  

Source: Aksoy, Serap - School of Public Health, Yale University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine