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MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, Jan. 2011, p. 375384 Vol. 31, No. 2 0270-7306/11/$12.00 doi:10.1128/MCB.00772-10
 

Summary: MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY, Jan. 2011, p. 375384 Vol. 31, No. 2
0270-7306/11/$12.00 doi:10.1128/MCB.00772-10
Copyright 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Conserved Catalytic and C-Terminal Regulatory Domains of the
C-Terminal Binding Protein Corepressor Fine-Tune the
Transcriptional Response in Development
Yang W. Zhang and David N. Arnosti*
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1319
Received 2 July 2010/Returned for modification 5 August 2010/Accepted 8 November 2010
Transcriptional corepressors play complex roles in developmental gene regulation. These proteins control
transcription by recruiting diverse chromatin-modifying enzymes, but it is not known whether corepressor
activities are finely regulated in different developmental settings or whether their basic activities are identical
in most contexts. The evolutionarily conserved C-terminal binding protein (CtBP) is recruited by a variety of
transcription factors that play crucial roles in development and disease. CtBP contains a central NAD(H)
binding core domain that is homologous to D2 hydroxy acid dehydrogenase enzymes, as well as an unstructured
C-terminal domain. NAD(H) binding is important for CtBP function, but the significance of its intrinsic
dehydrogenase activity, as well as that of the unstructured C terminus, is poorly understood. To clarify the
biological relevance of these features, we established genetic rescue assays to determine how different forms of
CtBP function in the context of Drosophila melanogaster development. The mutant phenotypes and specific gene
regulatory effects indicate that both the catalytic site of CtBP and the C-terminal extension play important, if

  

Source: Arnosti, David N. - Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine