Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Using Shared Representations to Improve Coordination and Intent Inference Joshua Introne and Richard Alterman
 

Summary: Using Shared Representations to Improve Coordination and Intent Inference
Joshua Introne and Richard Alterman
Volen Center for Complex Systems
Brandeis University
[jintrone, alterman@cs.brandeis.edu]
Abstract
In groupware, users must communicate about their intentions and maintain common knowledge via communi-
cation channels that are explicitly designed into the system. Depending upon the task, generic communication
tools like chat or a shared whiteboard may not be sufficient to support effective coordination. We have previ-
ously reported on a methodology that helps the designer develop task specific communication tools, called co-
ordinating representations, for groupware systems. Coordinating representations lend structure and persistence
to coordinating information. We have shown that coordinating representations are readily adopted by a user
population, reduce coordination errors, and improve performance in a domain task.
As we show in this article, coordinating representations present a unique opportunity to acquire user informa-
tion in collaborative, user-adapted systems. Because coordinating representations support the exchange of co-
ordinating information, they offer a window onto task and coordination-specific knowledge that is shared by
users. Because they add structure to communication, the information that passes through them can be easily
exploited by adaptive technology. This approach provides a simple technique for acquiring user knowledge in
collaborative, user-adapted systems.
We document our application of this approach to an existing groupware system. Several empirical results are

  

Source: Alterman, Richard - Computer Science Department, Center for Complex Systems, Brandeis University

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences