Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
From Micelles to Randomly Connected, Bilayered Membranes in Dilute Block Copolymer Blends
 

Summary: From Micelles to Randomly Connected, Bilayered
Membranes in Dilute Block Copolymer Blends
Jonathan H. Laurer, Jennifer C. Fung, John W. Sedat,§ Steven D. Smith,
Jon Samseth,# Kell Mortensen, David A. Agard,§,| and Richard J. Spontak*,
Department of Materials Science & Engineering, North Carolina State University,
Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, Graduate Group in Biophysics, University of California,
San Francisco, California 94143, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of
California, San Francisco, California 94143, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of
California, San Francisco, California 94143, Corporate Research Division, The Procter &
Gamble Company, Cincinnati, Ohio 45239, Department of Physics, Institute for Energy
Technology, N-2007 Kjeller, Norway, and Department of Physics, Risų National Laboratory,
DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark
Received September 12, 1996. In Final Form: January 24, 1997X
As macromolecular surfactants, diblock copolymers order into a variety of morphologies in the presence
of a parent homopolymer. Here, we probe the effects of chemical incompatibility and interfacial rigidity
on the morphology of copolymer/homopolymer blends at constant blend composition. Five copolymers,
each possessing a random-sequence midblock that is varied from 0 to 40 wt % of the copolymer molecular
weight, have been synthesized for this purpose. While copolymer micelles are representative of dilute
(homopolymer-rich) blends, complex bilayered morphologies, including vesicles and the anomalous isotropic
"sponge" phase, are produced upon increasing the midblock fraction. Small-angle neutron scattering

  

Source: Agard, David - Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California at San Francisco

 

Collections: Biotechnology; Biology and Medicine