Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Summary. In insect societies, a number of very striking collective structures are formed by individuals linking them-
 

Summary: Summary. In insect societies, a number of very striking
collective structures are formed by individuals linking them-
selves to one another. One such example is an army ant
bivouac. These structures are termed self-assemblages and
are part of a more general and important aspect of insect soci-
eties ­ intermediate-level parts ­ in which functional group-
level adaptive structures are formed. These parts are, in a
sense, the tissues and organs of complex insect societies.
Here we review the natural history of self-assemblages in
insect societies. We find that at least 18 different types of
structure exist: bivouacs, bridges, curtains, droplets, escape
droplets, festoons, fills, flanges, ladders, ovens, plugs,
pulling chains, queen clusters, rafts, swarms, thermoregula-
tory clusters, tunnels, and walls. These self-assemblages are
found in a variety of species of ants, bees, and wasps, but (as
far as we are aware) not in termites. The function of these
self-assemblages can be grouped under five broad categories
which are not mutually exclusive: 1) defence, 2) pulling
structures, 3) thermoregulation, 4) colony survival under
inclement conditions, and 5) ease of passage when crossing

  

Source: Anderson, Carl - Synthetic Intelligence, Qbit, LLC, Bethesda, MD
Theraulaz, Guy - Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition Animale, Université Paul Sabatier

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Engineering; Environmental Sciences and Ecology; Mathematics