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Atmospheric Environment 35 (2001) 115}124 Biogenic nitric oxide emissions from cropland soils
 

Summary: Atmospheric Environment 35 (2001) 115}124
Biogenic nitric oxide emissions from cropland soils
Paul A. Roelle , Viney P. Aneja *, B. Gay , C. Geron , T. Pierce
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8208, USA
US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, USA
Received 15 December 1999; accepted 15 May 2000
Abstract
Emissions of nitric oxide (NO) were determined during late spring and summer 1995 and the spring of 1996 from four
agricultural soils on which four di!erent crops were grown. These agricultural soils were located at four di!erent sites
throughout North Carolina. Emission rates were calculated using a dynamic #ow-through chamber system coupled to
a mobile laboratory for in-situ analysis. Average NO #uxes during late spring 1995 were: 50.9$47.7 ng N m\ s\ from
soil planted with corn in the lower coastal plain. Average NO #uxes during summer 1995 were: 6.4$4.6 and
20.2$19.0 ng N m\ s\, respectively, from soils planted with corn and soybean in the coastal region; 4.2$1.7 ng
N m\ s\ from soils planted with tobacco in the piedmont region; and 8.5$4.9 ng N m\ s\ from soils planted with
corn in the upper piedmont region. Average NO #uxes for spring 1996 were: 66.7$60.7 ng N m\ s\ from soils planted
with wheat in the lower coastal plain; 9.5$2.9 ng N m\ s\ from soils planted with wheat in the coastal plain;
2.7$3.4 ng N m\ s\ from soils planted with wheat in the piedmont region; and 56.1$53.7 ng N m\ s\ from soils
planted with corn in the upper piedmont region. An apparent increase in NO #ux with soil temperature was present at all
of the locations. The composite data from all the research sites revealed a general positive trend of increasing NO #ux
with soil water content. In general, increases in total extractable nitrogen (TEN) appeared to be related to increased NO

  

Source: Aneja, Viney P. - Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology; Geosciences