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11/01/2007 10:34 PMThe Feminine Critique -New York Times Page 1 of 3http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/01/fashion/01WORK.html?ei=5087&em=&en=8d76eff453dc226c&ex=1194062400&pagewanted=print
 

Summary: 11/01/2007 10:34 PMThe Feminine Critique - New York Times
Page 1 of 3http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/01/fashion/01WORK.html?ei=5087&em=&en=8d76eff453dc226c&ex=1194062400&pagewanted=print
November 1, 2007
LIFE'S WORK
The Feminine Critique
By LISA BELKIN
DON'T get angry. But do take charge. Be nice. But not too nice. Speak up. But don't seem like you talk too
much. Never, ever dress sexy. Make sure to inspire your colleagues -- unless you work in Norway, in
which case, focus on delegating instead.
Writing about life and work means receiving a steady stream of research on how women in the workplace
are viewed differently from men. These are academic and professional studies, not whimsical online polls,
and each time I read one I feel deflated. What are women supposed to do with this information?
Transform overnight? And if so, into what? How are we supposed to be assertive, but not, at the same
time?
"It's enough to make you dizzy," said Ilene H. Lang, the president of Catalyst, an organization that studies
women in the workplace. "Women are dizzy, men are dizzy, and we still don't have a simple
straightforward answer as to why there just aren't enough women in positions of leadership."
Catalyst's research is often an exploration of why, 30 years after women entered the work force in large
numbers, the default mental image of a leader is still male. Most recent is the report titled "Damned if You
Do, Doomed if You Don't," which surveyed 1,231 senior executives from the United States and Europe. It

  

Source: Archer, Cristina Lozej - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University

 

Collections: Geosciences; Renewable Energy