Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
THE NATURE OF THE PHYSICAL WORLD INTRODUCTORY NOTE
 

Summary: THE NATURE OF THE PHYSICAL WORLD
INTRODUCTORY NOTE
Just after the European War, at a time when to the generation who
had taken part in it, it seemed that nothing bigger or more important
could affect their lives, a young don at Cambridge University was
promulgating a very different view among all who had the good
fortune to come in contact with him. It was evident from his speech
and his writings that he had, or thought he had, experienced
something which was much more significant and far-reaching in its
implications than a mere European War; there was a restrained
fervor about him that was unmistakeable. This young man was Mr.
Eddington, now Sir Arthur, and a lapse of nearly twenty years has
shown that he was right. His contribution to philosophy is just
beginning to be fully recognized as the War is beginning to be fully
forgotten.
Sir Arthur Eddington was born at Kendal in 1882. By education he
is a mathematician of the highest possible distinction - he was
senior wrangler of his year in 1904. By profession he is an
astronomer, and thus his mature thought and research have been
diverted from the realm of pure mathematics into the stream of

  

Source: Henry, Richard C.- Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University

 

Collections: Physics