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Chromosome structure inside the nucleus Jason R. Swedlow, David A. Agard and John W. Sedat
 

Summary: Chromosome structure inside the nucleus
Jason R. Swedlow, David A. Agard and John W. Sedat
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, San Francisco, USA
Recent in situ three-dimensional structural studies have provided a new
model for the 30nm chromatin fiber. in addition, research during the
past year has revealed some of the molecular complexity of non-histone
chromosomal proteins. Still to come is the unification of molecular insights
with chromosomal architecture.
Current Opinion in Cell Biology 1993, 5:412-416
Introduction
In some unknown way, the massive length of nuclear
DNA is organized into chromatin and chromosomes
competent for transcription, replication and mitosis.
There is no single chromatin or chromosome structure.
Instead, it is likely that there is a set of interconvertible
states dependent on DNA-nucleoprotein interactions
and regulated by the cell as it passes through the cell
cycle. Many recent reviews have focused on the role
of chromatin structure, especially at the level of the
nucleosome, in transcription (see Croston and Kadon-

  

Source: Agard, David - Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California at San Francisco

 

Collections: Biotechnology; Biology and Medicine