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Polystyrene/Poly(methyl methacrylate) Blends in the Presence of Cyclohexane: Selective Solvent Washing or Equilibrium Adsorption?
 

Summary: Polystyrene/Poly(methyl methacrylate) Blends in the Presence of
Cyclohexane: Selective Solvent Washing or Equilibrium Adsorption?
Shane E. Harton,, Jan Lu1ning, Heike Betz,,# and Harald Ade*,|
Department of Materials Science & Engineering, North Carolina State UniVersity,
Raleigh, North Carolina 27695; Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory,
Stanford, California 94309; Department of Chemical Engineering, The PennsylVania State UniVersity,
State College, PennsylVania 16802; and Department of Physics, North Carolina State UniVersity,
Raleigh, North Carolina 27695
ReceiVed June 22, 2006; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed August 16, 2006
ABSTRACT: Cyclohexane has been frequently used as a selective solvent to remove PS layers or domains from
polystyrene:poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS:PMMA) blends and for reorganization or self-assembly of polymer
brushes and block copolymers. We have found that cyclohexane is not efficient at PS removal, observing significant
residual PS at PMMA surfaces. In contrast, 1-chloropentane was found to be a far greater selective solvent (i.e.,
residual PS was essentially nonexistent). These results were compared to PMMA surfaces after PS was allowed
to adsorb to the surface from a dilute theta solution in cyclohexane. Using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure
spectroscopy and inverse gas chromatography, coupled with self-consistent mean-field theory calculations, we
have demonstrated that selectively washing a polymer from a polymer blend is nearly identical to adsorption of
a polymer to a "soft" surface from a dilute solution. Improved knowledge about the effects of selective solvents
will improve experimental analysis of washed systems as well as manipulation of block copolymers and polymer
brushes for reorganization or self-assembly.

  

Source: Ade, Harald W.- Department of Physics, North Carolina State University

 

Collections: Physics