Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
1 Introduction The existence of plasticity in early visual processing is supported by perceptual-learning
 

Summary: 1 Introduction
The existence of plasticity in early visual processing is supported by perceptual-learning
studies where learning is specific to very precise features of the stimuli such as size,
orientation, or retinal position (Ramachandran and Braddick 1973; Fiorentini and
Berardi 1980; Ball and Sekuler 1982; Karni and Sagi 1991; Ahissar and Hochstein
1996b). In the classical perceptual-learning studies, subjects showed improvement only
gradually, over hundreds or thousands of trials. However, recently there have been a
number of reports of comparatively rapid learning which seems to be occurring early
in processing (Jeo et al 1995; Ahissar and Hochstein 1996a; Rubin et al 1997; Tanaka
and Sagi 2000).
These studies encouraged us to look for paradigms to study such rapid, low-level
learning. We began with the stimuli used by Jeo et al (1995). Instead of asking subjects
to identify whole geometric figures, however, we asked them to detect a pair of collinear
edges in an array of distractors. Below, we demonstrate that human subjects can improve
rapidly at this task, and that traces of this improvement remain up to a week. We
also tested the retention of learning in several transfer experiments, and we propose a
model for its underlying mechanism.
2 Methods
2.1 Experiment 1
2.1.1 Observers. Six adult subjects with normal or corrected vision were tested. Two

  

Source: Allman, John M. - Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine