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Geothermal systems in the Great Basin, western United States: Modern analogues to the roles of magmatism, structure,
 

Summary: Geothermal systems in the Great Basin, western United States:
Modern analogues to the roles of magmatism, structure,
and regional tectonics in the formation of gold deposits
Mark F. Coolbaugh*
Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, MS 178, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557-0088
Greg B. Arehart
Department of Geosciences, Mackay School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557-0088
James E. Faulds and Larry J. Garside
Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557-0088
Coolbaugh, Mark F., Arehart, Greg B., Faulds, James E., and Garside, Larry J., 2005, Geothermal systems in the Great Basin, western United States:
Modern analogues to the roles of magmatism, structure, and regional tectonics in the formation of gold deposits, in Rhoden, H.N., Steininger, R.C., and Vikre,
P.G., eds., Geological Society of Nevada Symposium 2005: Window to the World, Reno, Nevada, May 2005, p. 10631081.
1063
ABSTRACT
Western North America produces over one-third of the world's geothermal
power, and significant increases in power production are expected as additional plants
come on line. Many geothermal systems in western North America derive their heat
from magmas or cooling intrusions that occur in variety of tectonic settings, including
a triple junction, volcanic arc, hot spot, and pull-apart zones in strike-slip systems.
The interior of the Great Basin however, is characterized by widespread amagmatic

  

Source: Arehart, Greg B. - Department of Geological Sciences, Mackay School of Mines, University of Nevada, Reno

 

Collections: Geosciences