Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Wood Consumption by Geoffroyi's Spider Monkeys and Its Role in Mineral Supplementation
 

Summary: Wood Consumption by Geoffroyi's Spider Monkeys and
Its Role in Mineral Supplementation
Oscar M. Chaves1,2
*, Kathryn E. Stoner2,3
, Sergio A´ ngeles-Campos4
, Vi´ctor Arroyo-Rodri´guez2
1 Pontifi´cia Universidade Cato´lica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, 2 Centro de Investigaciones en Ecosistemas, Universidad Nacional
Auto´noma de Me´xico (UNAM), Antigua Carretera a Pa´tzcuaro No. 8701, Ex Hacienda de San Jose´ de la Huerta, Morelia, Michoaca´n, Me´xico, 3 Department of Biological and
Health Sciences, Texas A & M University-Kingsville, Kingsville, Texas, United States of America, 4 Departamento de Nutricio´n Animal y Bioqui´mica, Facultad de Medicina
Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Nacional Auto´noma de Me´xico, Delegacio´n Coyoaca´n, Mexico
Abstract
Wood consumption is a rare behavior in frugivorous primates; however, it can be necessary for nutritional balancing as it
may provide macro and/or micronutrients that are scarce in the most frequently eaten items (fruits). We tested this
hypothesis in six spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) communities inhabiting continuous and fragmented rainforests in
Lacandona, Mexico. We investigated the importance of both live and decayed wood in the diet of the monkeys, and
assessed if wood consumption is related to the nutritional composition of these items. In general, wood consumption was
focused on trees of Licania platypus (Chrysobalanaceae) and Ficus spp. (Moraceae), and was similar in continuous forest and
in fragments (mean 6 SD; 24620% vs 18616% of total feeding time, respectively), but marginally higher in females than in
males (16614% vs 564%, respectively). Live and decayed wood were both poorer in lipids, proteins, total nonstructural
carbohydrates, and total digestible nutrients compared to mature and immature fruits. Moreover, decayed wood of L.

  

Source: Arroyo Rodríguez, Víctor - Centro de Investigaciones en Ecosistemas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology