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Vistas in Astronomy, Voi.25, pp.315-335, 1982 0083-6656/82/030315-21510.50/0 Printed in Great Britain. All rights reserved. Copyright 1982 Pergamon Press Ltd
 

Summary: Vistas in Astronomy, Voi.25, pp.315-335, 1982 0083-6656/82/030315-21510.50/0
Printed in Great Britain. All rights reserved. Copyright 1982 Pergamon Press Ltd
THE ATMOSPHERE AND IONOSPHERE
OF JUPITER
S. K. Atreya and T. M. Donahue
Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, Space Physics Research
Laboratory, Ann Arbor, Michigan48109, U.S.A.
Abstract
The properties of the atmosphere of Jupiter are reviewed in the light of observa-
tions carried out by the Voyager mission. Solar occultation measurements in the
ultraviolet show that the temperature of the upper atmosphere is II00200K, an
apparent increase of about 30% from the value obtained by the Pioneer mission in
1973. Stellar occultation in the ultraviolet indicate that the temperature gra-
dient in the thermosphere is about IK km-I. These results pose problems for
candidate heating mechanisms because the heat input required is large (0.5 ergs
cm-2 s-1) and must be deposited at high altitudes. Solar EUV, inertia gravity
waves and particle and ion precipitation appear to be unsatisfactory mechanisms
for the equatorial thermosphere. Joule heating remains a possibility. For Joule
heating to be a viable mechanism, differential wind of several hundred meters per
second between the ions and neutrals is required throughout the entire ionosphere.

  

Source: Atreya, Sushil - Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, University of Michigan

 

Collections: Physics