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Swing leg retraction helps biped walking stability M. Wisse*, C. G. Atkeson, D. K. Kloimwieder
 

Summary: Swing leg retraction helps biped walking stability
M. Wisse*, C. G. Atkeson, D. K. Kloimwieder
* Delft University of Technology, www.dbl.tudelft.nl, m.wisse@wbmt.tudelft.nl
Carnegie Mellon University, www.cs.cmu.edu/cga
Abstract-- In human walking, the swing leg moves backward
just prior to ground contact, i.e. the relative angle between
the thighs is decreasing. We hypothesized that this swing leg
retraction may have a positive effect on gait stability, because
similar effects have been reported in passive dynamic walking
models, in running models, and in robot juggling. For this study,
we use a simple inverted pendulum model for the stance leg. The
swing leg is assumed to accurately follow a time-based trajectory.
The model walks down a shallow slope for energy input which
is balanced by the impact losses at heel strike. With this model
we show that a mild retraction speed indeed improves stability,
while gaits without a retraction phase (the swing leg keeps moving
forward) are consistently unstable. By walking with shorter steps
or on a steeper slope, the range of stable retraction speeds
increases, suggesting a better robustness. The conclusions of this
paper are therefore twofold; (1) use a mild swing leg retraction

  

Source: Atkeson, Christopher G. - Robotics Institute, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences; Engineering