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Billiards Digest February, 2012 "Ball Weight and Size Difference Effects Part I" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES
 

Summary: Billiards Digest February, 2012
"Ball Weight and Size Difference Effects Part I" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES
David Alciatore, PhD ("Dr. Dave")
Supporting narrated video (NV) demonstrations, high-speed video (HSV) clips, technical proofs (TP), and all
of my past articles can be accessed and viewed online at billiards.colostate.edu. The reference numbers used
in the articles help you locate the resources on the website. If you have a slow or inconvenient Internet
connection, you might want to view the resources from a CD-ROM or DVD. Details can be found online at:
dr-dave-billiards.com.
When playing on some coin-operated bar tables (AKA "bar boxes"), have you ever noticed that
sometimes it's difficult to draw the ball, or sometimes the CB rolls forward more than you think it should. Well
the reason could be differences in ball weights. The answer could also be that you are looking for excuses for
why you missed a shot or position, but let's assume for now that the balls are in fact reacting abnormally.
Recently, fellow BD columnist Bob and Jewett and I filmed a video showing all of the effects caused by cue
ball (CB) and object ball (OB) weight differences. In this article, I'll summarize the effects on square-hit shots,
and next month I'll focus on cut shots.
First of all, why would the CB and OB weights be different? In older bar boxes, the CB was made larger
and/or heavier to enable the ball-return mechanism to separate the CB from the OBs. Weight differences can
also occur with old and worn balls. Generally, with an originally equal-weight set, the CB will tend to be
slightly smaller and lighter because it takes more abuse from the cue tip, other balls, and cloth, and it wears
faster as a result. The 1-ball can also be smaller and lighter than the other OBs because it takes the full force

  

Source: Alciatore, David G. - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University

 

Collections: Engineering