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Neuroscience is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field concerned with understanding the relationship between brain, mind, and behavior. The faculty and students in the Neuroscience Program at Williams College forge research and teaching collaborations
 

Summary: Neuroscience is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field concerned with understanding the relationship between brain, mind, and
behavior. The faculty and students in the Neuroscience Program at Williams College forge research and teaching collaborations that
are a model for undergraduate liberal arts colleges. Our students and faculty work closely together on projects that integrate the work
of biologists, chemists, psychologists, and computer scientists in an attempt to understand the workings of the brain. Most upper
level courses are small and have associated laboratories; other upper level courses such as seminars and tutorials are even smaller and
emphasize close reading of the scientific literature. There are also opportunities to attend talks by invited speakers and perhaps
meet these prominent neuroscientists over dinner to discuss their work. Many students also attend national scientific meetings and
may even present their own research. This combination of challenging classroom instruction, individual research opportunities, and
exposure to the wider world of neuroscience prepares you for further education and careers in neuroscience and allied fields.
Concentration Requirements
Students interested in neuroscience may choose to pursue a
concentration in the field. The program requirements are a total of
seven courses including five courses specific to Neuroscience an
introductory course, 3 electives,
and a senior seminar plus two
required prerequisites, Biology
101 and Psychology 101.
Neuroscience (NSCI 201) is the
foundation course and provides
the background for other

  

Source: Aalberts, Daniel P. - Department of Physics, Williams College

 

Collections: Physics