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Computation of Inertial Motion: Neural Strategies to Resolve Ambiguous Otolith Information
 

Summary: Computation of Inertial Motion: Neural Strategies to Resolve
Ambiguous Otolith Information
Dora E. Angelaki,1,2 M. Quinn McHenry,2 J. David Dickman,1,2 Shawn D. Newlands,1 and
Bernhard J. M. Hess3
Departments of 1Surgery (Otolaryngology) and 2Anatomy, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson Mississippi
39216, and 3Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Zu¨ rich CH-8091, Switzerland
According to Einstein's equivalence principle, inertial accelera-
tions during translational motion are physically indistinguish-
able from gravitational accelerations experienced during tilting
movements. Nevertheless, despite ambiguous sensory repre-
sentation of motion in primary otolith afferents, primate oculo-
motor responses are appropriately compensatory for the cor-
rect translational component of the head movement. The neural
computational strategies used by the brain to discriminate the
two and to reliably detect translational motion were investi-
gated in the primate vestibulo-ocular system. The experimental
protocols consisted of either lateral translations, roll tilts, or
combined translation­tilt paradigms. Results using both
steady-state sinusoidal and transient motion profiles in dark-
ness or near target viewing demonstrated that semicircular

  

Source: Angelaki, Dora - Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University in St. Louis
Dickman, J. David - Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University in St. Louis

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine