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1.Here are two illustrative cases where this assumption is made, and where it indeed plays a fairly significant role in the theories developed. From Abbott 2000:"Typicallythe asserted
 

Summary: 1.Here are two illustrative cases where this assumption is made, and where it indeed plays
a fairly significant role in the theories developed. From Abbott 2000:"Typicallythe asserted
proposition [=what is presented as the main point of the utterance (m.s.)] will correspond to
the main clause of the uttered sentence, though of course this is not necessarily the case"
(1431); similarly, Wilson and Sperber 1979 (305-306) suggest that entailments of a main
clause will automatically be taken as more important (relevant) than entailments of a
-1-
Observations on embedding verbs, evidentiality, and presupposition
This paper discusses the semantically parenthetical use of clause-
embedding verbs such assee, hear, think, believe, discover and know.
When embedding verbs are used in this way, the embedded clause
carries the main point of the utterance, while the main clause serves
some discourse function. Frequently, this function is evidential, with
the parenthetical verb carrying information about the source and
reliability of the embedded claim, or about the speaker's emotional
orientation to it. Other functions of parenthetical uses of verbs are
discussed.
Particular attention is paid to the parenthetical uses of semi-
factive and factive verbs. It is demonstrated that when so used, these
verbs are in no waypresuppositional; that is, there is no presumption,

  

Source: Andrews, Peter B. - Department of Mathematical Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University

 

Collections: Mathematics