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4005RESEARCH ARTICLE INTRODUCTION
 

Summary: 4005RESEARCH ARTICLE
INTRODUCTION
The establishment of correct neuronal connections, also known as
neuronal wiring, is crucial for the function of the nervous system
in vertebrates. Axons have to navigate through their environment
and interpret extracellular cues in order to find their target cells and
make synaptic connections (O'Donnell et al., 2009). Axon
branching allows neurons to establish multiple connections with
their target cells, which can be neuronal or non-neuronal.
Therefore, axon branching is an essential process for neuronal
wiring during the development, repair and plasticity of the nervous
system (Acebes and Ferrus, 2000; Navarro, 2009). Numerous
studies have explored the role of extrinsic cues (including netrins,
semaphorins and neurotrophins) in the control of neuronal
branching (Campbell et al., 2001; Feldner et al., 2007; Marler et
al., 2008; Morita et al., 2006; Tang et al., 2004). By contrast,
relatively little is known about the role of intrinsic mechanisms that
regulate axonal branching (Goldberg, 2004).
Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a signalling
molecule involved in multiple aspects of neural development

  

Source: Amaya, Enrique - Healing Foundation Centre & Developmental Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine