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Published as: Aerts, D., 1998, "The entity and modern physics: the creation-discovery view of reality", in Interpreting Bodies: Classical and Quantum Objects in Modern Physics, ed. Castellani, E., Princeton
 

Summary: Published as: Aerts, D., 1998, "The entity and modern physics: the creation-discovery view of reality",
in Interpreting Bodies: Classical and Quantum Objects in Modern Physics, ed. Castellani, E., Princeton
University Press, Princeton.
The entity and modern physics: the creation-discovery-
view of reality1
Diederik Aerts2,3
Abstract: The classical concept of 'physical entity', be it particle, wave, field or system, has become a
problematic concept since the advent of relativity theory and quantum mechanics. The recent developments
in modern quantum mechanics, with the performance of delicate and precise experiments involving single
quantum entities, manifesting explicit non-local behavior for these entities, brings essential new information
about the nature of the concept of entity. Such fundamental categories as space and time are put into
question, and only a recourse to more axiomatic descriptions seems possible. In this contribution we want
to put forward a 'picture' of what an 'entity' might be, taking into account these recent experimental and
theoretical results, and using fundamental results of the axiomatic physical theories (describing classical as
well as quantum entities) such as they have been developed during the last decade. We call our approach
the 'creation-discovery view' because it considers measurements as physical interactions that in general
entail two aspects: (1) a discovery of an already existing reality and (2) a creation of new aspects of
reality during the act of measurement. We analyze the paradoxes of orthodox quantum mechanics in this
creation-discovery view and point out the pre-scientific preconceptions that are contained in the well-known
orthodox interpretations of quantum mechanics. Finally we identify orthodox quantum mechanics as a

  

Source: Aerts, Diederik - Leo Apostel Centre, Vrije Universiteit Brussel

 

Collections: Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources; Physics