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Synthesis and study of the heavy-fermion compound Yb5Pt9 M. S. Kim,1 M. C. Bennett,1 D. A. Sokolov,1 M. C. Aronson,1 J. N. Millican,2 Julia Y. Chan,2 Q. Huang,3
 

Summary: Synthesis and study of the heavy-fermion compound Yb5Pt9
M. S. Kim,1 M. C. Bennett,1 D. A. Sokolov,1 M. C. Aronson,1 J. N. Millican,2 Julia Y. Chan,2 Q. Huang,3
Y. Chen,3,4
and J. W. Lynn3
1Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1120, USA
2
Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA
3NIST Center for Neutron Research, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899, USA
4Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, USA
Received 29 June 2006; revised manuscript received 28 September 2006; published 26 December 2006
We report the synthesis of single crystals of a binary heavy-fermion system Yb5Pt9. An unusual double
phase transition is observed in specific heat CP measurements at 0.6 K and 0.65 K, signaling a magnetically
ordered ground state. The complete magnetic field-temperature phase diagram of Yb5Pt9 is obtained from the
magnetic field dependence of the electrical resistivity T and specific heat CP T , and consists of two phase
lines terminating at finite temperature critical endpoints. Electrical resistivity and specific heat measurements
show that the magnetically ordered state is a Fermi liquid with strong electronic correlations, absent in the
paramagnetic state. At higher temperatures, strong magnetic anisotropy is observed, which we ascribe to crystal
electric field effects acting on a well localized Yb3+
moment, yielding a well separated doublet ground state,
confirmed by inelastic neutron scattering measurements. Our measurements show that Yb5Pt9 is a heavy-

  

Source: Aronson, Meigan - Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY at Stony Brook

 

Collections: Materials Science; Physics