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2004 The Society for the Study of Evolution. All rights reserved. Evolution, 58(10), 2004, pp. 22522265
 

Summary: 2252
2004 The Society for the Study of Evolution. All rights reserved.
Evolution, 58(10), 2004, pp. 22522265
EVOLUTION OF ANT-CULTIVAR SPECIALIZATION AND CULTIVAR SWITCHING IN
APTEROSTIGMA FUNGUS-GROWING ANTS
PALLE VILLESEN,1,2 ULRICH G. MUELLER,2,3,4 TED R. SCHULTZ,5 RACHELLE M. M. ADAMS,2 AND
AMY C. BOUCK6
1Department of Ecology and Genetics, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
E-mail: palle@birc.dk
2Section of Integrative Biology, Patterson Laboratories, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712
3E-mail: umueller@mail.utexas.edu
4Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado 2072, Balboa, Republic of Panama
5Department of Systematic Biology, MRC 188, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, District
of Columbia 20560-0188
E-mail: schultz@lms.si.edu
6Department of Genetics, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602
Abstract. Almost all of the more than 200 species of fungus-growing ants (Formicidae: Attini) cultivate litter-
decomposing fungi in the family Lepiotaceae (Basidiomycota: Agaricales). The single exception to this rule is a
subgroup of ant species within the lower attine genus Apterostigma, which cultivate pterulaceous fungi distantly related
to the Lepiotaceae. Comparison of cultivar and ant phylogenies suggests that a switch from lepiotaceous to pterulaceous

  

Source: Adams, Rachelle M. M. - Department of Entomology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution
Schultz, Ted - Curator of Hymenoptera, Department of Entomology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine