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Introduction The follicle cell epithelium of the Drosophila egg chamber
 

Summary: 6075
Introduction
The follicle cell epithelium of the Drosophila egg chamber
plays essential roles in the development of the egg and embryo.
During oogenesis, the follicle cells signal extensively to each
other and to the germline cells to pattern the egg along its
anterior-posterior and dorsoventral axes (reviewed by Nilson
and Schüpbach, 1999). The follicle cells also undergo dramatic
migrations and cell shape changes, making the follicle cell
epithelium an excellent system for studying such processes as
morphogenesis and cell adhesion.
Oogenesis begins at the anterior tip of the ovary in the region
called the germarium when a germline stem cell divides to
form another stem cell and a daughter cystoblast [for a
review of oogenesis, see Spradling (Spradling, 1993)]. The
maintenance and division of the germline stem cells
require both intracellular mechanisms and intercellular
communication between the germline cells and three somatic
cell types at the anterior of the germarium: terminal filament
cells, cap cells and inner germarial sheath cells (reviewed by

  

Source: Alwes, Frederike - Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine