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MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser
 

Summary: MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES
Mar Ecol Prog Ser
Vol. 416: 229240, 2010
doi: 10.3354/meps08784
Published October 14
INTRODUCTION
A long-standing goal of ecology has been to under-
stand the relationships between organisms and the
habitats in which they reside (Bell et al. 1991). More
recently, there has been a focus on the effects of habi-
tat loss and fragmentation on biodiversity (Fahrig
2003) and the distribution and abundance of species
(Wiegand et al. 2005). Relationships between an
organism and the size of its habitat certainly vary
among taxa (birds: Conner & Rudolph 1991; lizards:
Hokit & Branch 2003; beetles: Crist & Ahern 1999).
However, studies that have investigated the effects of
disturbance on habitats have focused primarily on the
loss of habitat and not on fragmentation explicitly (but
see Fahrig 2003 and Johnson & Heck 2006).

  

Source: Anderson, Todd - Department of Biology, San Diego State University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology