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Outstanding Young Investigator Talk Presentation: Nanostructured Polymer-Titania Solar Cells
 

Summary: Outstanding Young Investigator
Talk Presentation: Nanostructured Polymer-Titania Solar Cells
Michael McGehee
Stanford University
The Outstanding Young Investigator Award has been established to recognize outstanding
interdisciplinary materials research by a young scientist or engineer. This award was presented to Michael McGehee of
Stanford University for his innovation in the application of organic semiconductors in lasers, light-emitting diodes,
transistors, and solar cells.
Michael McGehee graduated from Princeton University with a degree in physics (1994) after researching
mesostructure self assembly with Sol Gruner and Ilhan Aksay. He received a PhD (1999) from the University of
California-Santa Barbara for his research with Alan Heeger on the use of semiconducting conjugated polymers as
materials for lasers and light-emitting diodes. After graduating, he studied the co-assembly of block-copolymer/metal-
oxide nanostructures in the research groups of Galen Stucky and Brad Chmelka. In the spring of 2000, he joined the
faculty of Stanford University's Materials Science and Engineering Department. McGehee won the MRS Graduate
Student Gold Medal Award (1999), a Dupont Young Professor Award (2001), and an NSF CAREER Award (2001). He
was a Gilbreth Lecturer at the National Academy of Engineering's 2006 Annual Meeting.
At Stanford, McGehee has led a group of students who make ordered organic-inorganic bulk heterojunction solar cells,
studying the electronic processes that occur in them. His group also studied the effects of molecular packing on
charge transport in polymer field-effect transistors, and developed methods for improving light extraction from polymer
light-emitting diodes. He teaches classes on nanotechnology, polymer science, organic electronics, and solar cells.

  

Source: Aksay, Ilhan A. - Department of Chemical Engineering, Princeton University

 

Collections: Materials Science