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Fixing the Federalist: Correcting Results and Evaluating Editions for Automated Attribution
 

Summary: Fixing the Federalist:
Correcting Results and Evaluating Editions for Automated Attribution
Shlomo Levitan (levishl@iit.edu) and Shlomo Argamon (argamon@iit.edu)
Linguistic Cognition Laboratory
Department of Computer Science
Illinois Institute of Technology
Chicago, IL 60616, USA
Introduction
In the history of authorship attribution, the analysis of The Federalist Papers plays an important
role. However, most previous non-traditional (stylistic) authorship studies have been flawed,
mainly due to the use of improper editions, as documented by Rudman (2005). Our goal in this
work was to perform a correct study by using a revised corpus of the Federalist papers based in
large part on Rudman's critique. We used machine-learning techniques for analyzing the use of
lexical features for authorship attribution of the papers. Another goal of our study was to explore
how different corruptions of the corpus may affect the accuracy of the classification results, and
the differences between them.
The Federalist Papers were written during the years 1787 and 1788 by Alexander Hamilton, John
Jay and James Madison. These 85 propaganda tracts were intended to help to get the U.S.
Constitution ratified, and were all published anonymously under the pseudonym "Publius".
According to Avalon project (Yale Law School) Hamilton wrote 51 of the papers, Madison wrote

  

Source: Argamon, Shlomo - Department of Computer Science, Illinois Institute of Technology

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences