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International Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine and Science, Vol 4, No 2, pp 59-68, 2004 Printed in the USA. Al1 rights reserved.
 

Summary: ..- ~
International Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine and Science, Vol 4, No 2, pp 59-68, 2004
Printed in the USA. Al1 rights reserved.
~ 2004 Medical and Engineering Publishers, Inc
A SHEAR-THINNING VISCOELASTIC FLUID MODEL FOR
DESCRIBING THE FLOW OF BLOOD
M Anand,MS, KR Rajagopal,PhD*
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University
College Station, TX 77843 USA
ABSTRACT progress by the flow characteristics of blood [10, 13]. The relevance
of computational simulations in the development of cardiovascular
A model is developed for the flow of blood, within a thermodynamic devices, in particular blood pumps, has been highlighted in a recent
framework that takes cognizance of the fact that viscoelastic fluids article [3], and there is a need for powerful, yet simple, models that
can remain stress free in several configurations, ie, such bodies have can capture the complex rheological response of blood over a range of
multiple natural configurations (see Rajagopal [19], Rajagopal and flow conditions. In this article, we advance a model for blood and
Srinivasa [20]). This thermodynamic framework leads to blood being investigate its efficacy under conditions of steady and oscillatory
characterized by four independent parameters that reflect the flow.
elasticity, the viscosity of the plasma, the formation of rouleaus and Blood consists in multiple constituents namely red blood cel1s
their effect on the viscosity of blood, and the shear thinning that takes (RBCs), white blood cells, platelets, etc, suspended in a medium
place during the flow. The model emerges in a hierarchy of (plasma) of proteins and water, The plasma is a Newtonian fluid. The

  

Source: Antaki, James F. - Department of Biomedical Engineering & School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University

 

Collections: Engineering; Biology and Medicine