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Submitted to; Plates, Plumes & Paradigms, Foulger, G.R., Natland, J.H., Presnall, D.C, and Anderson, D.L., eds., Boulder, CO, Geological Society of America
 

Summary: Submitted to; Plates, Plumes & Paradigms, Foulger, G.R., Natland, J.H., Presnall, D.C, and
Anderson, D.L., eds., Boulder, CO, Geological Society of America
Global Tectonic Maps
David Sandwell, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Ca, USA, dsandwell@ucsd.edu
Don L. Anderson, 1
California Institute of Technology, Seismological Laboratory 252-21,
Pasadena, CA 92125, dla@gps.caltech.edu
Paul Wessel, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of
Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA, pwessel@hawaii.edu
Figures are available at: http://www.mantleplumes.org/Penrose/BookChapterPDFs/Sandwell.pdf
ftp topex.ucsd.edu
cd pub/sandwell/foulger
and
http://www.gps.caltech.edu/~dla/
The original kinematic plate tectonic model proposed that the outer shell (lithosphere) of the
Earth is divided into a small number of nearly rigid plates which are sliding over the weak
asthenosphere. The plates are the surface thermal boundary layer (TBL) of global-scale or
upper-mantle mantle convection and the descending slabs are the primary active components of
the convective system. Plate boundaries are generally narrow and are characterized by
earthquakes and volcanoes. Plates , however, are not really rigid or undeformable and plate

  

Source: Anderson, Don L. - Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology

 

Collections: Geosciences