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Law enforcement agencies have exploited biometrics for decades as key tools in forensic identification. With the evolution in information technology and the huge volume of
 

Summary: Abstract
Law enforcement agencies have exploited biometrics for decades as key tools in forensic
identification. With the evolution in information technology and the huge volume of
cases that need to be investigated by forensic specialists, automation of forensic
identification became inevitable. Postmortem (PM) identification requires use of
biometric characteristics that resist early decay of body tissues as well as withstand
severe conditions usually encountered in mass disasters. Dental features are the best
candidates for PM identification.
The Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS) of the FBI includes in its
strategic plan the creation of an Automated Dental Identification System (ADIS), with
similar goals and objectives to its Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS)
but using dental/teeth characteristics instead of fingerprints. ADIS will provide
automated search and matching capabilities for digitized radiographs and photographic
images.
Our Research teams at West Virginia University (WVU), Michigan State University
(MSU), and University of Miami (UM) are developing, in coordination with CJIS, a
research prototype of ADIS. Creating ADIS is a question of providing a highly automated
environment of efficient image processing techniques with the requirement of achieving
both high accuracy and timeliness. To this end, we are not only looking at automating the
steps taken by forensic experts to examine dental radiographs of subjects. But we are also

  

Source: Abaza, Ayman - West Virginia High Technology Consortium Foundation.

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences