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Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks When we use a disk, we sometimes wish it to be faster; I/O
 

Summary: 38
Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks
(RAIDs)
When we use a disk, we sometimes wish it to be faster; I/O
operations are slow and thus can be the bottleneck for the entire
system. When we use a disk, we sometimes wish it to be larger;
more and more data is being put online and thus our disks are
getting fuller and fuller. When we use a disk, we sometimes
wish for it to be more reliable; when a disk fails, if our data isn't
backed up, all that valuable data is gone.
In this note, we introduce the Redundant Array of Inexpen-
sive Disks better known as RAID [P+88], a technique to use
multiple disks in concert to build a faster, bigger, and more reli-
able disk system. The term was introduced in the late 1980s by
a group of researchers at U.C. Berkeley (led by Professors David
Patterson and Randy Katz and then student Garth Gibson); it
was around this time that many different researchers simulta-
neously arrived upon the basic idea of using multiple disks to
build a better storage system [BG88,K86,K88,PB86,SG86].
From the outside, a RAID looks like a disk: a group of blocks

  

Source: Arpaci-Dusseau, Remzi - Department of Computer Sciences, Department of Computer Sciences, University of Wisconsin at Madison

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences